Training That is Far From Ordinary

Looking through my photos from the last year, and seeing all of the photos from the different training days, I realized that to somebody who isn’t a first responder, and specifically a first responder in a challenging mountain environment like the one in which I live, our photos make us look insane.

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Our training officer demonstrates what different quantities of blood look like as blood puddles…

I have been lucky to have incredible instructors, who bring decades of experience to the classroom. They teach by the book, but more importantly, by real-life lessons and experience.

 

When most people think of firefighters and the types of calls that we respond to, they automatically picture structure fires or wildland blazes. However, the reality is that we are also often first response, or responding alongside EMS, for a wide variety of medical calls.  As first responders, we need to be able to provide a certain level of patient care; that is the least we can do for the people in our community. To meet the growing demand for firefighters to be medically trained, our department implemented a Medical First Responder program for all POC firefighters. The training was done in-house with a variety of instructors, and the program was developed alongside Alberta Health Services protocols.

Here are some highlights from our MFR training:

 

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Practicing using different kinds of splints

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Scoops are used for situations where log rolls can’t be used to put a patient on a backboard, for example when there is a fractured pelvis.

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Removing helmets while maintaining spinal control is important in an area where there are lots of skiers, mountain bikers and motorcyclists.

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Log rolling a patient onto a backboard while maintaining spinal immobilization.

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Practicing with a Seger splint, used to apply traction to femur fractures.

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Kendricks Extrication Devices are used for situations where a spine board cannot be used, but spinal control needs to be maintained.

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KEDs are perfect for vehicle extrications with spinal concerns.

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With new scientific research and a huge spike in mass casualty incidences in North America, the tourniquet is back in use. 

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What a great place to practice taking vitals 😉

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Practicing applying different kinds of bandages

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Lets play ‘guess how much blood ___ holds.’

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More blood splatter fun…

 

Aside from the MFR training, as part of my personal development plan, I attended the Banff Wilderness Care Conference, a weekend of interactive training and seminars all about medicine and first aid in an austere environment. You can check out some of those highlights here:

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Running wilderness rescue scenarios (yes, I had purple hair at the time 😛 )

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I got to learn hands on about helicopter rescue operations

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And how to package patients for helicopter transportation

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Alpine Helicopters are trained and certified by Parks Canada for rescue flying. These guys are incredible pilots.

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Configuring a helicopter to carry a stretcher

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Bundled up and ready to be slung (slinged? Whats the proper term??LOL)

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For slinging patients who do not have spinal concerns

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And while there was some ‘classroom’ time at the conference, they made sure it was interesting and hilarious.

 

There was a call this summer, that without going into details, changed my personal direction within firefighting. The call challenged my, and my teams, abilities and put all of our knowledge to the test. While we kicked butt on the call, it made me want to get better (and just MORE) training. I had toyed with the idea of going back to school to get my PCP, or primary care paramedic, certs and that call solidified my decision.

With a job application that I was submitting this fall, I needed my EMR, or Emergency Medical Responder certificate in order to be competitive. This certificate also entitles me to write the Alberta College of Paramedics examination and to register with them as a professional. I decided to wait to apply to PCP school until I finished this course since it would give me a better idea if I was sure that this is what I wanted. After the first week, I knew that I wanted this. I love the challenge that medical calls provide and I love the feeling that you are helping someone NOW.

So while I am seeking out more medical training, it is with the intention of becoming a better firefighter and rescuer. I have been pursuing technical rescue training over the last couple of years, and the medical training will tie in well with that.  It is incredibly exciting to feel like I have a path in front of me, one about which I am passionate. The future definitely holds some exciting things…

 

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High Angle Rescue training with Raven Rescue in Canmore

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Ice Rescue Training with Raven Rescue in Canmore

 

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